Estonia

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Estonia has no NPP, but is considering to build one.
 
Estonia derives over 90% of its energy from its oil shale reserves. However, the country is planning to significantly reduce its use of oil shale due to the resulting CO2 emissions. Estonia is relatively one of the world's biggest producers of CO2, with per capita emissions of 14 tonnes per year. 
  
The Estonian National Energy Development Plan until 2020, adopted by the Government and Parliament in 2009, foresees more diversity for Estonia’s energy portfolio. According to this Plan, Estonia’s electricity production could be diversified also by building a nuclear power plant. By one of the scenarios described in the Development Plan of the Estonian Electricity Sector until 2018, the Estonian electricity demand would be covered by the participation of the nuclear power plants in Lithuania and/or Finland and/or a small nuclear power plant to be constructed in Estonia (in the total amount of 1200 MW).
 
State-owned Eesti Energia plans to participate in a project to construct a new nuclear power reactor in Lithuania, at the Ignalina site. The project would also involve Latvia's Latvenergo, and Poland's Polskie Sieci Elektroenergetyczne.
There is no high level education specialized in the nuclear scope but there are some institutions involved in the nuclear research as the Estonian Academy of Sciences/Eesti Teaduste Akadeemia, Tallinn University of Technology/Tallinna Tehnikaûlikool and the Physics Institute of the University of Tartu/Tartu Ülikool.
 
NUCLEAR EDUCATION AND TRAINING
 
There is no high level education specialized in the nuclear scope but there are some institutions involved in the nuclear research as the Estonian Academy of Sciences/Eesti Teaduste Akadeemia, Tallinn University of Technology/Tallinna Tehnikaûlikool and the Physics Institute of the University of Tartu/Tartu Ülikool.